The Southern Food and Beverage Museum in New Orleans is such an awesome attraction!

An antique stove on display at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

A beautiful antique stove at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Photos of legendary chef Leah Chase at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Southern Food and Beverage Museum Shrine to legendary chef Leah Chase

A purple deli stand and menu at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

The Katrina Deli with its humorous offerings at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum


This was actually the second time Steve and I visited the Southern Food and Beverage Museum. The first time was years ago and it was in a hard to find, much smaller space on the riverfront. Since then they have moved to a fabulous space at 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. that is shared with Toups South. To read about another of Isaac Toups’ restaurants go here. SoFAB, as it’s known, is focused on the discovery, understanding, and celebration of the food and drink culture of the South. Though it is based in New Orleans, SoFAB examines and celebrates all the cultures that have come together through the centuries to create the South’s unique culinary heritage. In addition to amassing a huge collection of culinary memorabilia, they host cooking classes and special events.

A cooking class at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Jyl Benson teaching us how to make Chicken and Andouille Jambalaya at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

A giant red cocktail glass sculpture at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

A giant Southern Comfort cocktail sculpture at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Steve and I were fortunate to have been hosted by SoFAB to our admission and to the Creole Cooking Class and Lunch that was taught by Jyl Benson who is the Director of Culinary Programming at the museum. We started off with a flavorful plate of Smothered Okra and Tomatoes. And while we enjoyed our appetizer Jyl filled us in on some cool tidbits about how Creole cooking and how cooks used bits and pieces of leftovers to create dishes like jambalaya. It was a great segue into learning how to prepare our entrée of Chicken and Andouille Jambalaya. She also enthusiastically told us about Wayne Jacobs Smokehouse in Laplace, Louisiana, where they make the very best andouille sausage. So, of course, we had to take the short drive to Laplace the next day and buy andouille, tasso ham, caramelized onion sausage, and smoked boudin with rice! It is a good thing we came prepared with freezer packs and cooler. But don’t worry, they also ship, so you can buy online.

A woman standing under the French Market arch at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Our tour guide at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

An old wooden bar with bartender statue at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

An antique bar and bartender at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

All sorts of kitchen apparatus on display at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

While Jyl continued to prepare our Jambalaya another woman gave a tour of the museum. We learned that the museum was now on the property that originally housed the French Market, and they tried to keep the feel of the original market stalls when displaying the many, many culinary relics of a bygone era. Did you know that pigs and chickens were not native to the new world? They were brought here by Spain. I will have to remember that for a night of Trivial Pursuit.

A woman with a container of chopped scallions and a pan of jambalaya at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Jyl Benson getting ready to garnish our Jambalaya with chopped Scallions at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

A wall of everything for the cocktail at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Cocktails Anyone?

A white antique stove and other kitchen items on display at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Another antique stove and other kitchen relics at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum

Once we returned to the culinary classroom we were served a very delicious jambalaya which we ate while we were shown how to make Bananas Foster. Our three-course lunch culminated with our devouring the Bananas Foster over Vanilla Ice Cream. The perfect ending to a quintessential Creole Lunch.

Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 11:00 AM to 5:30 PM Closed Tuesdays. Regular hours can be affected by public and private events so please check to see what we have scheduled!

Admission: 

  • Adults: $10.50 per person Cooking classes are an additional charge
  • Students (with ID), Military, and Seniors over 60: $5.25 per person
  • Children Under 12 (with an adult): Free

  

Steve and I were graciously hosted by the Southern Food and Beverage Museum but the opinions are 100% our own.